We require proof of vaccine or negative COVID test for showings before 5pm on weekdays.
View Our Health Guidelines
All Screwed Up

All Screwed Up

Opens  June 22, 2022

Details About the Film

This film is part of the series Passport: Love & Anarchy

Two Southern country boys who travel north to get work in Milan. Arriving with nothing but the clothes on their backs, they join the labor movement and live in a communal home with other migrant workers, including some combative love interests. Their dreams of wealth devolve into a series of slapstick adventures, from an uproarious attempt at petty crime to the daily indignities of life in a restaurant kitchen.

A pointed satire that skewers the illusion of upward mobility, All Screwed Up is a comedy whose laughs stick in your throat.

Presented By

From 1963 until her death in 2021, Italian filmmaker and screenwriter Lina Wertmüller weaponized comedy to skewer the status quo. While championing the downtrodden, she seared political ideology across the spectrum, reveling in the essential absurdity of the modern world and humanity full stop.

The first female filmmaker to receive a Best Director nomination at the Oscars, she challenged the second-wave feminism of her time, weaving class consciousness and gender politics into common cloth, shredding both proletarian male-chauvinists as well as the women of the bourgeoisie.

Extravagantly colorful, sexually-charged, and acidicly funny, we present three films produced in rapid succession from 1972-1974 finding Lina Wertmüller and global cinema writ large at a charmingly anarchic high.

Director(s): Lina Wertmüller
Starring: Luigi Diberti, Lina Polito, Sara Rapisarda, Giuliana Calandra, Isa Danieli
Year Released: 1974
Runtime: 108 minutes
Country: Italy
Language(s): In Italian with English subtitles
Content Warning(s): Depictions of Sexual Assault / Rape

Film Reviews

"Breathtaking... exuberantly funny. Watching 'All Screwed Up' is to be witness to a giant talent."
–Vincent Canby, The New York Times
"Wertmüller is the most important director since Ingmar Bergman"
–John Simon, New York Magazine
chevron-down